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Outcomes

"Is not this the kind of fasting I have chosen: to loose the chains of injustice and untie the cords of the yoke, to set the oppressed free and break every yoke" — Isaiah 58

We want to try and understand, through our work, what breaking ‘every yoke’ means because breaking one alone is rarely enough to release someone from oppression.

We try and measure and monitor our ‘success’ through our ‘outcomes’ (see below) — but before you get to that it is probably worth hearing how one of our tenants defined success because we will never capture them in 7 statistics!

Success is different for everyone. As far as success goes for the homeless its not as simple as putting a roof over their head because the walk of their life probably has been a difficult and complicated one.

Hope into Action tenant
An Image

So success can only be measured by an individual at an individuals own pace.

Success could be the healing of an angry emotional wound. It could be learning to love yourself. It could be finding peace. As far as modern society goes it is about being able to hold down a job, abide by the law and be presentable. That is great if life were that simple. But any step in the right direction is a success and who are we to judge !

April 1st 2018

With that caveat here is our best, albeit floored, attempt at capturing a measure of the tenants successes for the year ending April 1st 2018 across our 7 properties.

Maintaining tenancy 89%
In total we gave a home to 38 male adults including homeless Brits, refugees, asylum seekers and migrant workers. We also temporarily housed 3 wives along with their husbands.
Abstaining from crime 77%
77% of those who had previously been in custody, abstained from crime. 10 out of the 13 people who had previously been to prison returned to custody. The others are still on the straight and narrow.
Reducing alcohol or drug intake 53%
This is still an area we have struggled in however it is hoped that the addition of a specialist in substance misuse to the team will empower more tenants to overcome issues of alcohol and drugs in their lives.
Improved social relations with their family 79%
Relationships are key to turning lives around.
Volunteering education or training 55%
The majority of our residents are studying at college or doing in-work training to upskill and improve their prospects.
Got a job and held it for 6 weeks or more 36%
About a third of our tenants are consistently finding work and paying their way in preparation for moving on to independent living.
Moved on positively 81%
Of the 20 tenants who moved on, 16 of them moved on positively having gained life skills and built networks of support around them.

In the year ending April 1st 2017

In the year ending April 1st 17 we were providing homes for up to 23 tenants in 7 homes with 2 houses dedicated to refugees and 2 dedicated to young people (18 to 25 years of age).

Maintain tenancy 85%
In total we gave a home to 27 male adults including homeless Brits, refugees, asylum seekers and migrant workers. Those who failed to maintain their tenancy were for the most part struggling with issues of substance misuse.
Abstain from crime 80%
80% of those who had previously been in custody, abstained from crime. 1 out of the 5 people who had previously been to prison returned to custody. Others who have been in and out of prison for most of their lives are enjoying their longest period of freedom in a long time.
Reduced their drug or alcohol intake 43%
The rise in the availability of new psychoactive substances such as mamba has presented a significant challenge to all service providers across the city. We had to tighten our referrals procedures and policies as a result.
Improved social relations with family 74%
This is absolutely vital to the sense of well-being of all our residents.
Maintained education, training or employment 74%
The majority of our residents are studying at college or doing in-work training to upskill and improve their prospects.
Got a job 37%
More and more of our residents are finding work and paying privately despite the challenges presented by zero hours contracts.
Moved on Positively 80%
Of the 15 tenants who moved on,12 of them moved on positively having gained life skills and built networks of support around them.